Taken a few months ago

Nicely done. Portraiture in a small space is tough, using grids on the lights and lots of negative fill certainly helps if you're going for contrasty low key shots - it can be really tough (to almost impossible) to prevent light spilling everywhere.

As you've posted in the critique thread, is there anything specific you're trying to achieve with your portraits or anything you'd like help with?

From my own experience with my kids, I really love just setting up a stage for them to be within (backdrop, lights, etc) and just then chat to them or let them do what they like within that space and see what I can catch. I can never seem to get anything 'real' when I try to pose them, but I get some really nice candid moments when we just talk about things or allow them to be animated within the space. Body language, facial expression, things that are uniquely "them" tend to come out a lot easier. Look for the moments between talking, when they're thinking about an answer to a question or pondering the meaning of something you've said.
 
Nicely done. Portraiture in a small space is tough, using grids on the lights and lots of negative fill certainly helps if you're going for contrasty low key shots - it can be really tough (to almost impossible) to prevent light spilling everywhere.
Thank you
As you've posted in the critique thread, is there anything specific you're trying to achieve with your portraits or anything you'd like help with?
Not really, if you can spot anything for improvement, I'm always happy to listen
From my own experience with my kids, I really love just setting up a stage for them to be within (backdrop, lights, etc) and just then chat to them or let them do what they like within that space and see what I can catch. I can never seem to get anything 'real' when I try to pose them, but I get some really nice candid moments when we just talk about things or allow them to be animated within the space. Body language, facial expression, things that are uniquely "them" tend to come out a lot easier. Look for the moments between talking, when they're thinking about an answer to a question or pondering the meaning of something you've said.
The best decision I made in recent times was to purchase a Canon R. Mainly for eye focus, it allows me to keep the camera tri-pod mounted, of which allows me to converse with the subject face to face rather than behind the camera. Its a lot easier for posing and also puts them more at ease. Posing Kids is not easy, especially when they are your own grandkids and they are not interested in what you are asking. I really would like to have more adults sit for me.
 
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I think both of these are well lit. My only suggestion would be one of pose. Instead of having the shoulder straight towards you, try having the shoulder at 45 - 60 degrees - face still looking at the camera.
 
Very nice. I would like to see the head and shoulder turned a little more toward the camera in photo 1.
 
Thanks for the input everyone.
I understand the comments about awkwardness of pose, I was trying different idea's to get out of the normal as in the example here.
Thanks again
 

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The back view is a bit of a paradox. Is she turning her back to us, or turning to meet us? I totally get the "try something different" thing; sometimes you find something cool and I am by no means a sticker for any kind of "never show backs & butts" action shooter rule. Sometimes showing where someone is going is what makes the picture. In this case, I think if you're going to show so much back then the back needs to be a bit more meaningful, like a flexing-muscles pose, looking like she's about to run away, doing a very deliberate "not talking to you!" look, just something that makes it relevant would make it work better.

If you want to experiment more with this angle, consider having her straighten her back more and maybe drop the near shoulder slightly. That would be a more mature pose, for better or worse. Ideally (again IMO) you would pull the hair a bit more together and see about straightening the seam in her skirt. If she's game, play around with having her swing her hair around so you get a sense of motion of her turning to see us. My girls really like "hair flick" shots.

The face is GREAT! Good light, good color, and she looks interested.

Extreme hair flick:

IMG_2615.jpg
 
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