SOLAR - Show us your images of our sun

I do still have the T3i, but it is infested with hot, dead, and/or stuck pixels. That is one of the reasons I went for a new camera. I may check it out if we get some sunshine, we're actually getting a few days of rain and clouds. I won't be trying to get a lot of the "partial" because I won't be seeing totality anyways, just get a few shots while I'm on a little vacation.
I haven't even checked out the app yet, just downloaded it. I might check that out today.

Edit: Canon Connect app with R8 and Samsung S9 FE tablet works for remote live view control, RF or EF-S lenses
 
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Rebel T3i EF-S55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM, at 250. 1/200 f5.6 ISO 400, used autofocus. 100% crop SOOC. Boring sun today ? Cellphone shot showing histogram on my PC monitor, Photoshop elements.

solarT3i by *dxd*, on Flickr

histoT3i by *dxd*, on Flickr
 
I was not expecting to use my Nikon P1000 for astronomy but rather for birds when I bought it for Xmas. But then I got a ND 100,000 solar filter to use for the eclipse, then started practicing a couple months ahead, and have found it to be interesting.
I took this shot of the Sun yesterday Apr 14th. There seems to be a lot of spots and some faint areas toward the top that I would like to get better detail of, but wondering if there is a certain wave length filter that I could get, or would this camera even work for that?
Would H-alpha emission filter get more?
DSCN1465.jpeg
This one was Mar 28
DSCN1273.jpeg
 
I was not expecting to use my Nikon P1000 for astronomy but rather for birds when I bought it for Xmas. But then I got a ND 100,000 solar filter to use for the eclipse, then started practicing a couple months ahead, and have found it to be interesting.
I took this shot of the Sun yesterday Apr 14th. There seems to be a lot of spots and some faint areas toward the top that I would like to get better detail of, but wondering if there is a certain wave length filter that I could get, or would this camera even work for that?
Would H-alpha emission filter get more?

This one was Mar 28
Very nice images, some lovely detail.

I understand that consumer cameras for “normal” terrestrial use incorporate various on-board filters to cut out the extremes of UV and IR wavelengths, so that only the main ROYGBIV spectrum of wavelengths are recorded.

Although you can get special H-Alpha filters, I suspect that most modern cameras will be “blind” to those frequencies due to on-board filtering by the manufacturer.

Canon did have an EOS Ra camera that did not have these filters, and so it could be used for astrophotography at H-Alpha wavelengths, so worth checking out before investing in other filters.

Dennis.
 
On HA, there are basically two types, a Dedicated Solar Scope with a built in Etalon i.e. filter and a place at the back either diagonal or straight through for an eyepiece or camera, Lunt or Coronado. The other is the Daystar Quark or similar, that one is a etalon that you put on a telescope, refractor not reflector or Schmidt or Mak, and then put an eyepiece or camera into the Quark. They only pass a very narrow band of light and are adjustable. They run from $1,200 up to ouch.
 
On HA, there are basically two types, a Dedicated Solar Scope with a built in Etalon i.e. filter and a place at the back either diagonal or straight through for an eyepiece or camera, Lunt or Coronado. The other is the Daystar Quark or similar, that one is a etalon that you put on a telescope, refractor not reflector or Schmidt or Mak, and then put an eyepiece or camera into the Quark. They only pass a very narrow band of light and are adjustable. They run from $1,200 up to ouch.
Thanks, I guess I’ll just have to do the best I can with what I’ve got and continue to admire the GREAT images that you share.
Very nice images, some lovely detail.

I understand that consumer cameras for “normal” terrestrial use incorporate various on-board filters to cut out the extremes of UV and IR wavelengths, so that only the main ROYGBIV spectrum of wavelengths are recorded.

Although you can get special H-Alpha filters, I suspect that most modern cameras will be “blind” to those frequencies due to on-board filtering by the manufacturer.

Canon did have an EOS Ra camera that did not have these filters, and so it could be used for astrophotography at H-Alpha wavelengths, so worth checking out before investing in other filters.

Dennis.
Thanks Dennis, I’m glad I ask, before throwing my $$$ away on something that wouldn’t work. Getting as nice as my images were reminds me of a line in a Lyle Lovett song about red-neckness, first you catch it on your fingers, then it crawls right up your sleeve! I guess I’m stuck at level “red-neck astronomer”. 🤪😎
 
I was not expecting to use my Nikon P1000 for astronomy but rather for birds when I bought it for Xmas. But then I got a ND 100,000 solar filter to use for the eclipse, then started practicing a couple months ahead, and have found it to be interesting.
I took this shot of the Sun yesterday Apr 14th. There seems to be a lot of spots and some faint areas toward the top that I would like to get better detail of, but wondering if there is a certain wave length filter that I could get, or would this camera even work for that?
Would H-alpha emission filter get more?
View attachment 61825
This one was Mar 28
View attachment 61826
Those are really great shots! Kudos!

At one time, there were companies that would remove the filters from off-the-shelf DSLRs for astro use, but I don't know if they're still around. One that I remember was called Hutech. Canon has done a couple of small volume runs without the filter for astro purposes. @Dennis mentioned the EOS Ra, and there was also a 20Da and 60Da if I'm not mistaken.
 
Those are really great shots! Kudos!

At one time, there were companies that would remove the filters from off-the-shelf DSLRs for astro use, but I don't know if they're still around. One that I remember was called Hutech. Canon has done a couple of small volume runs without the filter for astro purposes. @Dennis mentioned the EOS Ra, and there was also a 20Da and 60Da if I'm not mistaken.

I am not sure how removing the filter would help with HA but then I have only used ZWO cameras with my solar HA filters. I would think that for about the same price as modifying a camera you could get a monochrome ZWO camera t use in HA filter or scope. Remember you want a monochrome camera as the sun only transmits in one wavelength, red, a color camera wastes 3/4 of the light.
 
I am not sure how removing the filter would help with HA but then I have only used ZWO cameras with my solar HA filters. I would think that for about the same price as modifying a camera you could get a monochrome ZWO camera t use in HA filter or scope. Remember you want a monochrome camera as the sun only transmits in one wavelength, red, a color camera wastes 3/4 of the light.
I was responding to a post about cameras with extended HA range. As I recall, these cameras were sold for general astrophotography, not necessary solar photography (and you know more about that than I do). Many deep sky objects, particularly emission nebulae, emit light in the HA and longer wavelengths. The sensors have extended red sensitivity, but these wavelengths are blocked by the standard filters on "terrestrial" digital cameras.
 
I was responding to a post about cameras with extended HA range. As I recall, these cameras were sold for general astrophotography, not necessary solar photography (and you know more about that than I do). Many deep sky objects, particularly emission nebulae, emit light in the HA and longer wavelengths. The sensors have extended red sensitivity, but these wavelengths are blocked by the standard filters on "terrestrial" digital cameras.
You are correct, I missed the point. I started out with a white light filter on a 100-400 lens and slowly well not totally slowly went down the rabbit hole of solar
 
If you haven’t been keeping an eye on the Sun since the eclipse, there is surely a lot of activity going on up there. I’ve had a cloudy sky since Sunday, and even just shot this through thin clouds, so not as sharp as I would have liked.

DSCN1478.jpeg
 
Since we are in this sunspot cycle, I try to get out and take a few pics daily so I can track them. However, I just have to guess at where the North Pole is, relative to my viewing from ~34* N latitude at a certain time of day, and making sure my camera is level. Is there an app somewhere which make those calculations and makes it simple?

It’s springtime here at my location which means lots of cloudy days that I miss tracking the spots.
I guess the simplest way,,,,,, if I could remember to do it, would be to take a shot at say, 8:00 AM and another at 4:00 PM, IF there is a spot near the edges, like in the last image I posted. Then N would be half way between. If there was only one near the center, it wouldn’t appear to change.
I don’t know why I even want this info. It’s not like I’m planning to go there!🤪😎
 
Since we are in this sunspot cycle, I try to get out and take a few pics daily so I can track them. However, I just have to guess at where the North Pole is, relative to my viewing from ~34* N latitude at a certain time of day, and making sure my camera is level. Is there an app somewhere which make those calculations and makes it simple?

It’s springtime here at my location which means lots of cloudy days that I miss tracking the spots.
I guess the simplest way,,,,,, if I could remember to do it, would be to take a shot at say, 8:00 AM and another at 4:00 PM, IF there is a spot near the edges, like in the last image I posted. Then N would be half way between. If there was only one near the center, it wouldn’t appear to change.
I don’t know why I even want this info. It’s not like I’m planning to go there!🤪😎
I've used a compass, along with the "Polar Scope Align Pro" app. The app is meant for sighting Polaris in a polar scope, but it also has a daytime mode that I find helpful. Here's a video that talks about using it that way:

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Since we are in this sunspot cycle, I try to get out and take a few pics daily so I can track them. However, I just have to guess at where the North Pole is, relative to my viewing from ~34* N latitude at a certain time of day, and making sure my camera is level. Is there an app somewhere which make those calculations and makes it simple?

It’s springtime here at my location which means lots of cloudy days that I miss tracking the spots.
I guess the simplest way,,,,,, if I could remember to do it, would be to take a shot at say, 8:00 AM and another at 4:00 PM, IF there is a spot near the edges, like in the last image I posted. Then N would be half way between. If there was only one near the center, it wouldn’t appear to change.
I don’t know why I even want this info. It’s not like I’m planning to go there!🤪😎

If you do go, go at night so you don't get a sunburn :cool:
 
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