Post your Moth Photos

A Jersey Tiger. This is a fairly rare moth in the UK, but we get at least one in our garden every year. They have red hindwings that transform the moth when it flies, but in 15 years of trying I have never managed it: they never perch with their wings open.
Jersey Tiger.jpg
 
A Jersey Tiger. This is a fairly rare moth in the UK, but we get at least one in our garden every year. They have red hindwings that transform the moth when it flies, but in 15 years of trying I have never managed it: they never perch with their wings open.
View attachment 15604
Beautiful. Bummer they don't perch with open wings.
 
Fantastic you have the larva photo.
I have lots of them. Some years ago, this species was abundant in the yard; I don't see so many now. I reared some in a terrarium outdoors and photographed their development. Here's a lucky shot of a Sabulodes larva during a molt. It's in the process of pulling off the previous instar's head capsule.

HeadMolt11:3c.jpg
 
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I have lots of them. Some years ago, this species was abundant in the yard; I don't see so many now. I reared some in a terrarium outdoors and photographed their development. Here's a lucky shot of a Sabulodes larva during a molt. It's in the process of pulling off the previous instar's head capsule.

View attachment 16345
What a wonderful project!!
 
A Jersey Tiger. This is a fairly rare moth in the UK, but we get at least one in our garden every year. They have red hindwings that transform the moth when it flies, but in 15 years of trying I have never managed it: they never perch with their wings open.
View attachment 15604

A Jersey Tiger. This is a fairly rare moth in the UK, but we get at least one in our garden every year. They have red hindwings that transform the moth when it flies, but in 15 years of trying I have never managed it: they never perch with their wings open.
View attachment 15604
Jack, I have a suggestion for getting a shot with the wings open, besides sticking on a pin. If you’ve seen them in the early evening, or know the moth or week to expect them, is to get out in the early morning while it is coolest and they’ve gone to roost. Some moths have to flutter a bit before they can take off, so I give them a nudge to wake them up and get get them fluttering. The flash will freeze the motion of the wings, and if you have a flash that has a short cycle span, you can get several shots to choose from.
Not all moths need to warm up, but some do.
 
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