Nests of the animal kingdom

Avondale87

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2023
Posts
273
Likes
1,485
Location
Tasmania
Image Editing
Yes
I started this at POTN several years ago and it received many beautiful examples

There's a lot of differing nests, dens, lairs, squats, anything animals reside in or 'nest' in.
We have some awesome ant nests.

Spent a lifetime in the bush and always amazed at how beautifully made birds nests can be
Here's one from our garden. not sure what it is, maybe a Grey Fantail or Cranky Fan
Post away and if helps to ID something for all to see then add the inhabitants also

Grey Fantail
Grey Fantail.jpeg

Welcome Swallow
2 Swallow in nest.jpeg
 
The first time that I ever saw a bald eagles nest in the real .... I was astounded. The nest really was a good 2 meters across !
(Forgive the rather poor photograph, as in 2010, I didn't have very good photography equipment. But I'd found an eagles nest, and eagles)

IMG_3825-XL.jpg



IMG_4041-XL.jpg
 
The Grey Fantail is quite inquisitive and will closely approach an observer. It feeds on flying insects, which it catches by chasing them from the edge of foliage at all levels in the canopy.

The Grey Fantail builds its nest in a thin tree-fork, unusually between 2 and 5 metres from the ground. It is made of fine grass bound together with large amounts of spider web. The bottom of the nest is drawn out into a long stem, resembling that of a wine-glass. Both parents share nest-building, incubation of the eggs and feeding of the young when they hatch.

A Grey Fantail on its nest in the Lamington National Park.
Dennis

7D Mark II IMG_7325 Crop 1600 A.jpg

7D Mark II IMG_7325 Crop 1600 B.jpg
 
Interesting
What's happening in second photo OhLook?
How come it's in 2 halves?
The second photo was taken one day after the first. I cut the mudball open to find out what kind of thing it was. There were 13 caterpillars. I put them in a small container and photographed them after they'd been largely consumed. If I find the photo, do you want to see that? :sick:
 
The second photo was taken one day after the first. I cut the mudball open to find out what kind of thing it was. There were 13 caterpillars. I put them in a small container and photographed them after they'd been largely consumed. If I find the photo, do you want to see that? :sick:
Well yes, please
 
The second photo was taken one day after the first. I cut the mudball open to find out what kind of thing it was. There were 13 caterpillars. I put them in a small container and photographed them after they'd been largely consumed. If I find the photo, do you want to see that? :sick:
You ate them? How did they taste? I'm guessing bitter.
 
Continuing with the contents of the mud nest: This is one of the uglier parts of nature, from humans' point of view. The two photos above were taken Sept. 16 and 17, 2012.

September 20: The wasp larva is the plump one at 12:00.

PotterLvaEdit9:20:12.jpg

September 26:

PotterLvaEdit9:26:12.jpg
 
The nest of a killdeer (Charadrius vociferus), photographed at Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve in Hillsboro, Oregon.

Although out in the open, the mottled eggs are remarkably hard to spot. The bird also does a broken wing routine to distract potential predators and draw them away form the nest.

53532322173_3defe8d15c_o.jpg
 
My second try at posting to this section on birds nests. Hope it comes through this time. This is a Verdin building a nest in my front yard in Arizona. Used a Canon 50D and a 100-300 zoom lens with a Canon 580 EX flash. Flash did not bother the Verdin and it continued with its project as I was sat on a bench about 7 feet from the nest.1709499136738.jpeg
 
My second try at posting to this section on birds nests. Hope it comes through this time. This is a Verdin building a nest in my front yard in Arizona. Used a Canon 50D and a 100-300 zoom lens with a Canon 580 EX flash. Flash did not bother the Verdin and it continued with its project as I was sat on a bench about 7 feet from the nest.View attachment 47261
That's the best photo of one of those that I have seen. I never realised that they had a russet bit on their wing.
 
Back
Top Bottom