Hasselblad 1000f Ektar 80mm f/2.8 vignetting

Jeff USN Photog 72-76

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Jeffrey Padell
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Looking for some feedback. I have a Hasselblad 1000f with a Ektar 80mm lens. My first roll of film through it I was looking for light leaks and loaded it Tri-X and let it sit in the direct sun for a day and then shot the film, seemed to be some light leaking see thread https://focus-on-photography-forum.net/threads/hasselblad-1000f-light-leaks.790/#post-9654 . Then to try it again I loaded it with Ilford FP4 ASA 125.
Took it into town and shot the train station at different f stops. Wide open (f/2.8) no vignetting, but more and more up to F/22. Could it be the lens hood causing this or something with the camera?


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Vignettning is usually improved/eliminated by stopping down. At least with lenses for LF where coverage increases as you stop down.

On the other hand, depth of field increases as you stop down, so the lens hood is more likely to be visible. You get the same effect photographing through bars where the lens can't go into the gap - the smaller the aperture, the more the bars show.

Based on that reasoning, I go with the lens hood.

I've never used a Hasselblad though, my medium format cameras being Mamiya and Bronica.
 
Vignettning is usually improved/eliminated by stopping down. At least with lenses for LF where coverage increases as you stop down.

On the other hand, depth of field increases as you stop down, so the lens hood is more likely to be visible. You get the same effect photographing through bars where the lens can't go into the gap - the smaller the aperture, the more the bars show.

Based on that reasoning, I go with the lens hood.

I've never used a Hasselblad though, my medium format cameras being Mamiya and Bronica.

Talking with others I agree it is the lens hood, wrong one for the camera. Actually if I don't shoot into the sun I don't need it.
 
Hi Jeff - I never had your model - only worked with the 500CM and 503CW but I've used a number of incorrect lens hoods over the years for the Hassy as well as other gear, and I've created the effect you posted here. I agree with you and Stephen that it is likely the lens hood.

Technically you can get away without the hood when not shooting near the sun. But sometimes I'm a bit of a klutz or I'm not careful of door jambs and trees the camera swings on its strap and....BANG. I regard the hood as a break-away bumper. I used to do a lot of weddings and it came in handy many times that way ;).
 
I picked up a Hasselblad 1000f from a friends estate for $100, has a Kodak Ektar f/2.8 lens and my first roll of film through it looked like it had light leaks and I had blown the exposures anyway, no enough light. 2nd roll I got vignetting in the corners from an incorrect lens hood. This is the 3rd roll and 1st color roll. I had taken off the hood so vignetting seems to be gone, and I don't see any hint of light leaks.
This was shot out my den window and the wire in the upper left is my ham radio antenna wire.
1st shot is run through Lightroom and then the others are to see if there might be a light leak showing on the right side of frame (I do have and will replace the light seal with a kit)

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Hi Jeff - perseverance pays off and that looks good to me - nice! That kodak lens looks pretty sharp too. I can even see a Downy Woodpecker which looks to be a female. We get a lot of those guys in our feeders :).
 
There seems to be some discoloration on the right side
You know Jeff, I did notice that but I wouldn't consider it optical. I don't believe it is "physical layer" as they say in trouble-shooting. From my own experience in the darkroom - and from bad labs, it almost looks like some sort of uneven processing. On my monitor the color balance on that right edge is actually more blue than the rest of the image which is pleasantly warmer.

Are there any adjacent frames that you can compare it to?

Another thought just occurred to me - how old is that film?
 
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You know Jeff, I did notice that but I wouldn't consider it optical. I don't believe it is "physical layer" as they say in trouble-shooting. From my own experience in the darkroom - and from bad labs, it almost looks like some sort of uneven processing. On my monitor the color balance on that right edge is actually more blue than the rest of the image which is pleasantly warmer.

Are there any adjacent frames that you can compare it to?

Another thought just occurred to me - how old is that film?

Film is new Kodak Gold, expires in Jan 2025. I haven't gotten the negs back yet, sent it to Dale in FL. I had noticed on a B&W roll they had processing streaks. These are from scans they did. I think my neg roll of film I will send to "Old School Photo Lab" in NH and see how they do.
 
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